now it’s a travel blog

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Ok, sorry for not posting for so long.  I have been very busy with moving in and starting my new life in Incheon.  The work days are long, I stay pretty busy over the weekends and I’m starting marathon training.  I have had time to write, but it always gets filled in by other things.

So here it is, some more writing.  I guess it’s a travel blog now.  That might not be right though, I don’t think I consider it traveling.  It’s probably better to classify it as some sort of partial immigration.  “Immigrant” implies permanency which is something I am considering more seriously every day, but I’ll stick to “partial” because there really isn’t any way to predict what will happen.  So, expat-travel-immigration blog, commence:

My life is pretty awesome.  I arrived about a month ago and the first week was a bit rough.  Not because of homesickness or some huge blunder or anything, mostly because the jet lag was bad for about a week and I was very busy that week.  I spent my first 4 nights in a ‘love motel’ which are pretty popular in this country for various reasons.  Anyway, it was a really nice place with a lot of space and comfortable accommodations.  I got to move into my apartment the friday of that week.  I moved everything in, got things settled a bit, and then broke my key in the door.  I was locked out of my apartment and away from all of my stuff for all of Halloween weekend.  That bummed me out, but my co-workers let me wear their clothes an use their apartments, Halloween weekend was saved.

My apartment is pretty nice.  It took me a while to get used to the size, it’s cramped but its still larger than a dorm room and it’s all mine.  Here’s a picture of it from the upstairs bedroom:

My landlord fixed the lock situation pretty quickly, in time for me to get settled in before my first full week of teaching.  At first, I was a bit apprehensive about the age groups that I would work with.  From 10 to 2:30 I teach Moon Class, a small class of 7 year olds.  They love me (no joke, they give me cards saying that all the time).  By the end of the first week, I was convinced that it was convinced that it was the best possible age group to teach.  They are enthusiastic and smart beyond what I expected.   After 2:30 I have 3 classes.  The first two are small groups of 9 year olds at a beginners level.  I alternate a divided block with a Korean teacher so some days of the week I have a class then two breaks then a class.  After those two, I have a group of 12 year olds in my advanced class (reading/writing/grammar).  This is a great class.  We work through the lesson plan pretty well then we just practice conversation for the last 5 minutes of class.  They get to practice talking in english, and I get to listen to their funny stories and tell them mine.  It doesn’t feel like work at all.

I have a lot going on.  I am learning Korean, playing the guitar, training for a marathon, I inherited a bunny (tokki), I’m reading all the time, teaching, exploring etc.  It’s all pretty sweet.

I came to Korea at the perfect time.  The weather is great (most of the other teachers complain of the cold but I am fine in a long sleeve shirt just about every day).  I came during the lantern festival, in time for Halloween, and just before pepero day (their valentines day).  I was invited to a Korean wedding.  I spent a lot of my first two weekends in Seoul with my co-teachers.  We explored the shops, bars, and a buddhist temple.  There are a lot of expats from all over the world, and very interesting korean people.  I’ve been here for about a month, and it feels like it went by in the blink of an eye.

I’ll write more, I promise.  For now, enjoy the pictures

Peace.